Patio Conversion

 

     The conversion of this patio to a usable room took only 1-week.  It was only about 4 hours of work a day.  With my schedule at the time and the project located next door, I was still able to accomplish quite a bit in that short period of time.  This space getting the afternoon sun and winters chill, is an area that was not getting the intended use.  With a household having small  pets, this was an ideal space to convert for the dogs allowing the family to enjoy their home.

        The overall structure of the building was in place, so there was no need for additional structural support.  This space is 8 feet by 16 feet.  Though the intent is to utilize it for the pets, it will eventually be used as a sewing room.  Three windows were installed to allow ample sunlight. 

     I started with securing the frame to the floor with 1/2 inch by 5 inch anchor bolts.  I recommend predrilling the holes with a smaller cement drill bit.  It makes it easier for the actual size being used to grasp the edges.  Also, I used all pressure treated lumber to minimize the possibility of termites.  Tar paper 30 Grid was also used to insulate from the wind.

     The windows are 36 inch by 36 inch.  All the materials used were obtained through Home Depot, and a materials list is provided at the bottom of the page.  The material cost for this project was $860.07.                                              

  The frame spacing is 2 feet on center.  Since most patio slabs on older homes are not always level, I had to compensate for a 1/2 inch downgrade.  For a frame of 2 inch by 4 inch, R-30 Insulation is recommended, however, as a matter of preference, I used R-19.  Because of the size of the space you will find that the dry wall will not always center to the frame.  That being the case, I placed additional frame supports for stability.  Too many times you will find that when you are doing home renovations that the contractors do not place additional supports for the dry wall but simply paper tape it and use joint compound to hide the connection. 

      Standard siding was used which comes primed but still requires painting.  Another option is the use of a composite.  The panels are thinner but heavier because they are made with cement.  One good thing about them is that you will not have to worry about termites or any bugs getting to them.  For the outside corner, I used 1 inch by 4 inch lumber.  One tool that I recommend you invest in is a Router.  With this tool you can create a finished look by rounding off the edges of the trim.  If you purchased lumber already with the edges smoothed, it would cost you at almost $2 more per board.  
 
     The door was inexpensive, only $51.  Though this door is designed for indoor use and not as an outer door, you can provide added protection from the elements by giving it three coats of paint.  Also, an alternative is to use Marine Grade Polyurethane. 
 
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

           The indoor paint used  was a High Gloss Antique White by Behr.  The high gloss gives you a smoother surface for cleaning and provides reflective lighting.  The only item that I got from Lowes was the Pet Entry Door.  Home Depot does not carry them in a large size.  You can also order a Screen Metal Door with the pet door included from the Internet, however, it is much more expensive.  This pet entry door was much less and easy to install.                                

      The outside paint was also a High Gloss and color matched to the existing structure.  With this Patio Conversion, the family was not only able to get the privacy they were looking for but the pets managed to have a place of their own with easy excess to the yard.  In addition, I extended the Central Air to the room providing a luxury space for the animals.  This conversion was not that difficult to do.  All it takes is making up your mind to go for it.

    

 

1 2x4x8 Lumber 17   2.97   50.49
2 Paint (Gallon) 2   28.96   57.92
3 R-19 2   15.67   31.34
4 Siding 5   22.97   137.82
5 Deck Screws Lrg Box 1       28.24
6 Dry Wall 8x4x5/8 5   5.53   27.65
7 Tar Paper (30-Grid) 1       16.5
8 Chauking 8   2.97   23.76
9 Joint Compound 1       6.55
10 Moulding (244x.45) 4       15.85
11 1x4x8 Lumber 12   2.97   35.64
12 Window 32"x32" 1       63
13 Door 1       51
14 Door Weatherstrip 1       3.57
15 Paint Brush 2" 1       5.97
16 Dry Wall Screws 2" 1       5.94
17 Cement Drill Bit 1/2" 1       4.95
18 Bolts 1/2" Anchors 10       11.48
19 Joint Tape 1       1.55
20 Pet Entry (Medium) 1       51.73
21 Key Lock 1       8.97
22 Window 36"x36" 2   69   138
23 Metal Edging 1       1.48
24 Aluminum Foil Tape 1       6.32
25 Paint Brush 3" 1       6.97
             
        Total   792.69
        8.5% Sales Tax   67.38
            860.07

 

         

 

 





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